Some medieval English sausage recipes

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Some medieval English sausage recipes

Postby vagreys » Wed May 25, 2011 8:44 am

English (c. 1390) – Recipes from Forme of Cury

168. Sawge yfarcet. Take pork and seeþ it wel, and grinde it smal, and medle it wiþ ayren & brede ygrated. Do þerto powdour fort and safroun wiþ pynes & salt. Take & close litull balles in foiles of sawge; wete it with a batour of ayren & fry it, & serue it forth.

169. Sawgeat. Take sawge; grynde it and temper it up with ayren. Take a sausege & kerf hym to gobetes, and cast it in a possynet, and do þerwiþ grece & frye it. Whan it is fryed ynowȝ, cast þerto sawge and ayren; make it not to harde. Cast þerto powdour douce & messe it forth. If it be in ymbre day, take sauge, buttur, & ayren, and lat it stonde wel by þe sauge, & serue it forth.

182. Farsur to make pomme dorryse and oþere þynges. Take þe lire of pork rawe, and grynde it smale. Medle it vp wiþ eyren & powdre fort, safroun and salt; and do þerto raisouns of coraunce. Make balles þerof, and wete it wele in white of ayren, & do it to seeþ in boillyng water. Take hem vp and put hem on a spyt. Rost hem wel, and take persel ygrounde and wryng it vp with ayren & a perty of flour, and lat erne aboute þe spyt. And if þou wilt, take for persel, safroun; and serue it forth.

184. Hirchones. Take þe mawe of þe grete swyne, and fyfe oþer sex of pigges mawes. Fyll hem full of þe self fars & sowe hem fast. Perboile hem; take hem vp, & make smale prikkes of gode past, and frye hem. Take þese prickes yfryed & set hem þicke in þe mawes on þe fars, made after an vrchoun withoute legges. Put hem on a spyt & roost hem, & colour hem with safroun, & messe hem forth.

Sources:
Hieatt, Constance B. and Sharon Butler, eds. Curye on Inglysch : English culinary manuscripts of the fourteenth century (including the “Forme of Cury”). New York: Oxford University Press for the Early English Text Society, 1985.

If you need help with the Middle English, I can translate, though I'm sure a number of folk, here, could just as easily.
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Modern English translations

Postby vagreys » Wed May 25, 2011 8:22 pm

168. Sawge yfarcet. Take pork and seeþ it wel, and grinde it smal, and medle it wiþ ayren & brede ygrated. Do þerto powdour fort and safroun wiþ pynes & salt. Take & close litull balles in foiles of sawge; wete it with a batour of ayren & fry it, & serue it forth.

168. Stuffed Sage. Take pork and parboil it well [to remove some of the gamey taste], and grind it finely [with a mortar and pestle], and mix it with egg and grated fresh bread. Add some of the spice blend called 'Powdour Fort" [strong spices] and saffron with pine nuts and salt. Make little balls of the meat mixture and close them up in leaves of sage. Wet them with an egg batter and fry them and serve them forth. A recipe for 'powdour fort' is in the thread I made of some medieval spice blends to consider for sausage.

169. Sawgeat. Take sawge; grynde it and temper it up with ayren. Take a sausege & kerf hym to gobetes, and cast it in a possynet, and do þerwiþ grece & frye it. Whan it is fryed ynowȝ, cast þerto sawge and ayren; make it not to harde. Cast þerto powdour douce & messe it forth. If it be in ymbre day, take sauge, buttur, & ayren, and lat it stonde wel by þe sauge, & serue it forth.

169. Sage Dish. Take sage; grind it [in a mortar] and mix it with eggs. Take a sausage and cut it into small pieces, and toss them in a small cooking pot, and add grease and fry the sausage bits. When it has fried enough, add the sage-egg mixture; make sure it does not overcook. Sprinkle on some of the spice mixture called "Powdour Douce" and serve it forth. If it is an Ember Day [the Wednesday, Friday and Saturday after the first Sunday in Lent, after Whitsunday, after September 14, and after December 13], [leave out the sausage and] take sage, butter and eggs, and let it set up well around the sage [essentially like a frittata] and serve it forth. A recipe for 'Powdour Douce' is also among the medieval spice blends thread I posted.

182. Farsur to make pomme dorryse and oþere þynges. Take þe lire of pork rawe, and grynde it smale. Medle it vp wiþ eyren & powdre fort, safroun and salt; and do þerto raisouns of coraunce. Make balles þerof, and wete it wele in white of ayren, & do it to seeþ in boillyng water. Take hem vp and put hem on a spyt. Rost hem wel, and take persel ygrounde and wryng it vp with ayren & a perty of flour, and lat erne aboute þe spyt. And if þou wilt, take for persel, safroun; and serue it forth.

182. Forcemeat to make Golden Apples [Pommes d'Or] and other things. Take the raw liver of pork and grind it small. Mix it with egg and the spice blend called "powdour fort", saffron and salt; and add to that mixture raisins of currants. Make balls of the mixture, dip them well in egg whites, and cook them in boiling water [long enough to set the egg white]. Remove them from the water and put them on a spit. Roast them well [over wood coals], and take ground parsley and wring out the juice into a thin mixture of egg and flour [to make a green batter] and paint the mixture on the meatballs roasting on the spit. And if you wish, substitute saffron for the parsley [to make a golden batter]; and serve it forth.

184. Hirchones. Take þe mawe of þe grete swyne, and fyfe oþer sex of pigges mawes. Fyll hem full of þe self fars & sowe hem fast. Perboile hem; take hem vp, & make smale prikkes of gode past, and frye hem. Take þese prickes yfryed & set hem þicke in þe mawes on þe fars, made after an vrchoun withoute legges. Put hem on a spyt & roost hem, & colour hem with safroun, & messe hem forth.

184. Urchins [Hedgehogs]. Take the stomach of a large hog, and five or six pig stomachs. Fill them full of pork forcemeat [minced, seasoned pork mixture] and sew them tightly closed. Parboil them and remove them from the boiling water. Make small spikes of good paste (flour paste or dough] and fry them. Take these fried spikes and stick them in the stomach casing of the forcemeat so they make a dense covering, made to resemble an urchin [hedgehog] without legs. Put them on a spit and roast them, and color them with saffron, and serve them forth.
- tom

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Postby grisell » Wed May 25, 2011 8:27 pm

Hehe. Nice to read English that is quite comprehensible to a Swede! :D

(Of course, Medieval English was much closer to the Scandinavian languages than contemporary English)
André

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